10/8/19 – OCTOBER HORROR MOVIE PICK #8 – Eyes Without a Face (1960)

Let’s go slightly obscure. To a horror fan, this choice isn’t obscure at all, but many of you will have never heard of it. You know, sometimes it’s difficult to make these all-inclusive October lists because there are so many ways I can go with my choices. I find that the majority of the people reading like when I go with mostly newer releases, but there are so many amazing movies that I can’t solely do that. I also like to go back to the early stuff and pick a few classic black and whites, as well as many from my beloved 80’s, and pretty much every other decade in between. Today, I’m not just feeling classic, but French, as well as black and white. If you’re in the mood for a wonderfully twisted vintage horror flick, look no further than 1960’s Eyes Without a Face. This movie has always stuck with me, and having rewatched it recently, is beginning to cement itself as one of my favorite B&W horrors. There’s something so off-putting and deliciously disturbing about this movie that I can’t help but love it. The premise follows a renowned doctor who runs a hospital out in the rural areas of Paris, but in classic mad doctor fashion, has a secret hidden lab where he runs macabre experiments on both dogs and human subjects. His focus is trying to perfect the world’s first human face transplant, in order to replace his daughter’s current disfigured one. There are so many aspects to this movie that are just downright creepy. First and foremost, there is the iconic emotionless mask that his daughter is forced to wear. This mask is everything. It’s been the source of many homages. From being the centerpiece of Pedro Aldomovar’s, The Skin I Live In (which is sort of a remake, actually) to John Carpenter once saying that it birthed the idea of Michael Myer’s emotionless mug. It’s just perfect. But the mask isn’t the only thing people remember. Let’s just say for 1960, there is a very graphic scene in this film that made people pass out in theaters. How awesome is that? And for me personally, since Suspiria is my favorite horror film, it’s always wonderful to see the exquisite Alida Valli in another role. Give it a shot, folks. It’s really a delightfully warped French horror classic.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s